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Truck Driver Error, a Major Cause of Large Truck Accidents

According to the non-profit research organization Highway Loss Data Institute, there were 3,500 fatal large truck accidents in 2013. In these accidents, 570 truck drivers lost their lives; other victims of these fatal accidents included passengers of smaller vehicles, bicyclists, motorcyclists, and pedestrians.

A number of surveys say that accidents involving passenger cars and trucks are more blamable on car drivers; however, a study conducted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) says that trucking accidents are more due to errors committed by truck drivers rather than drivers of passenger cars.

These errors are usually results of many different factors which directly affect a truck driver’s capability to react properly and on time to danger. The top three factors that the FMCSA has identified include driver fatigue, driving too fast for road conditions, and impairment due to alcohol, prescription drugs or over-the-counter-drugs. There are other causes of errors, of course, including speeding, unfamiliarity with the road or vehicle, driving distractions and inattention, improper attachment of trailer, failure to check blind spots, depowering of the front brakes (this is what truck operators commonly do in order to minimize wear and tear on tires and breaks and so save on operating costs), and failure to make sure that the brakes are in good working condition before starting a long drive.

Once on the road, truck drivers can practically do whatever they want, like drive continuously despite feeling fatigued, just to be able to cover as many road miles as possible, or drive over the speed limit or too fast for certain road conditions. Because of these, as well as the fact that driving a truck is just much more challenging than driving any passenger vehicle, both the federal and local authorities make sure that a driver, before being granted a commercial driver’s license, has been given the necessary training in the safe operation of large trucks, has passed the required tests, and is totally aware of how dangerous trucks can be on roads and highways.

According to the law firm Ravid & Associates, P.C,. “Commercial trucks are a common and accepted presence on U.S. highways. Driving amongst them can be intimidating, however, due to their massive size. Although truck drivers are especially trained to drive these vehicles, sometimes they may drive negligently or even make a careless mistake that results in a devastating accident. When this occurs, drivers must be held entirely accountable for any damages in order to cover the costs that victims may be burdened with.”
An Iowa personal injury lawyer, points out, though, how highly complex legal matters can be. Thus, if you are considering pursuing legal action, then it may be in your best interest to secure the services of a qualified truck accident or personal injury attorney.

NFL Players are Paying the Cost of Such Entertainment with Their Health and Long-Term Well-Being

Any type of sports comes with the risk of injury; however, football, being a high-impact sport, has the highest risk of injury. Obviously, football and injuries go hand-in-hand. With all the tackling, blocking and other physical interactions between players, post-game recaps would always include a list of casualties and injuries, including contusions and concussions or injuries that range from minor, but bothersome to severe and debilitating.

The most common football injuries include:

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injuries – This knee injury, which is due to damage or tear to the anterior cruciate ligament occurs when a player is struck from the front or rear;

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries – This knee injury is a result of forceful impact to the side of the knee.

Torn meniscus – Another knee injury wherein the meniscus (a thin fibrous cartilage or the firm, whitish, flexible connective tissue between the surfaces of some joints) is torn. This occurs when a player rotates his body while his foot stays planted on the ground.

Ankle sprains and strains – This is probably the most common sports injury. The soft tissues of the ankles are susceptible to damage when players pivot, change direction, or put too much pressure on the ankle joint.

Muscle contusions – This is a large, deep bruise affecting large muscles, usually in the thigh. This injury can impair muscle function.

Torn hamstrings – Players who are not conditioned or properly warmed up are prone to this injury, especially after a burst of speed.

Shoulder tendinitis – This is due to the repetitive motion of throwing.

Shoulder separation or dislocation – This is separation of the acromioclavicular joint due to direct blow below the shoulder; a dislocation, on the other hand, occurs when the head of the humerus separates from the scapula.

Though most injuries sustained by professional football players are musculoskeletal injuries, there are two other injuries that are more serious because they affect the brain: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Concussion.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain. It can lead to memory loss, dementia and depression. Concussion, meanwhile, is “a change in mental state due to a traumatic impact. Not all those who suffer a concussion will lose consciousness. Some signs that a concussion has been sustained are headache, dizziness, nausea, loss of balance, drowsiness, numbness/tingling, difficulty concentrating, and blurry vision. The athlete should return to play only when clearance is granted by a health care professional.”

In its website, the law firm Ali Mokaram shares two incidences where two NFL players suffered head injuries: “Cowboys quarterback Troy Aikman suffered a serious blow to the head during the 1993 NFC Championship Game, in which a knee to the head eventually landed him in the hospital that evening. In 1994, Chicago Bears fullback Merrill Hodge retired from football completely following a blow to the head that, according to reports, left him unable to recognize his close family members, including his wife.”

The firm further says, “In the opinion of an increasing number of scientists, NFL players are paying the cost of such entertainment with their health and long-term well-being. Once their playing careers have ended, many NFL players find that the physical toll that playing professional football has taken on their bodies makes them unable to live a productive, healthy life. Some of these injuries include physical pain from broken bones and joint injuries, but increasing evidence shows that many professional athletes also have suffered degenerative brain disease from repeated concussions as a result of playing in the league.”

Scaffold Injuries And The Law

Scaffolds help construction workers work effectively in their assigned areas. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimate that 65% of construction workers use scaffolds. Instead of a ladder, scaffolds give the employee a more stable foundation for doing his work. Scaffold injuries are one of the most severe injuries in construction sites. The website of www.kff-law.com reveals that it is the job of the employer to make sure that their workplace is safe.

Scaffolds in construction sites are regulated by the OSHA. The design and construction of such structures must comply with OSHA requirements. Each scaffold and its components must be able to support its own weight and at least four times the maximum desired load without fail. The suspension ropes, on the other hand, must be able to support at least six times the maximum desired load.

Inspection of the scaffold must be done by a competent person for any visible defects. Scaffolds must be erected, moved, dismantled, or altered under the supervision of the said person. Inspection of all components of personal fall protection should also be done by a competent person prior to use. Visible damage or worn equipment should be removed from the site immediately.

The Scaffold Law or the New York Labor Law Section 240 provides protection to construction workers from the potential risks associated with working on and around scaffolds. Violators shall be subjected to absolute liability for failing to provide adequate safety regulations and devices. Under the law, an injured worker need not be an actual employee of the contractor and they are legally liable for any injuries.

The Scaffolds Law involves complicated issues concerning party liability and compliance with safety regulations. For this reason, you need the help of an experienced attorney to enlighten you on the matter. They can help you receive just compensation for the injuries you will incur.

5 Most Common Amusement Park Injuries

When people want to have fun and adventure, one of the places they go to is the amusement park. Some rides in these theme parks allow people to try out the extreme and uncover their fears. Thousands of people ride various attractions that theme parks has to offer. From roller coasters to water rides, it gives visitors a form of enjoyment. According to the website of Williams Kherkher, amusement parks can put at risk all the riders who can get injured or even die if a park does not have safety procedures.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), a combined 15,000 people were treated in emergency rooms due to amusement-park related injuries. Half of those injured were children ranging from 10 to 14 years old. Children were also involved in three quarters of accidents where a rider falls or is forcefully ejected from an amusement park ride.

In the history of amusement parks, there were some of the worst accidents recorded such as the the one in 2008 when a teenager riding the Batman : The Ride rollercoaster was killed when he jumped the ride’s surrounding fence in order to retrieve his hat at Six Flags in Georgia. In 2007, a 13-year old girl’s feet was severed when a cable of the Superman : Tower of Power ride at Six Flags Kentucky snapped.

Amsuement park rides are regulated by the government. They are categorized into fixed-site and mobile. The former are rides that have permanent fixtures and do not travel from one location to another. Examples of these are those rides found in Disneyland and Six Flags. Mobile rides, on the other hand, travel from one site to another.

Some common amusement park injuries include head, neck, and back injuries from bumper cars or from spinning rides and roller coasters. One of the worst theme park accidents is death from falling or thrown from a ride. Brain injury caused by G-forces and stress on the brain caused by high speed rides or from detached objects hitting the head of the rider. Accidents may also cause lacerations, broken bones, or torn ligaments.

According to the CPSC, there are several factors that can cause injury or death to amusemnt park riders

  • Mechanical Failure – This includes the detachment of safety restraints in the middle of the ride or an important stuctural component breaking down due to manufacturing defect or negligence in maintaining the ride.
  • Improper Operation – When the operator of the ride puts the ride to an abrupt stop or improperly removes the seatbelt.
  • Passenger Misuse – This includes intentional rocking of the car, standing up in the middle of the ride, or not following safety instructions
  • Inherent Nature of the Ride – Sometimes the injury or death is caused by the very nature of the ride itself. Some people complain of headache or dizziness and suffer from cerebral and retinal hemorrhage because of the rapid spinning movement of the rides.

Prevention of amusement park injuries is a responsibility of the owner as well as the riders. For the owner, they should ensure the safety of their rides by adding safety features. For the riders, they can look after their own welfare by following the safety guidelines of the ride.

Accident at an Amusement Park, What Do I Do?

Nobody ever imagines anything bad ever happening at an amusement park. By definition, these are places where happy memories are made with friends and family. There should only be smiles, laughter, and good times had within these walls as everything else just ceases to matter for a little while.

Unfortunately, this is the real world – and sometimes, bad things can happen even in amusement parks.

There is a certain standard of care that is expected for the thrills and attractions that come with these parks. After all, people don’t just sign up for soaring fifty feet into the air only to experience a sudden drop or even the spectacle that are the rollercoasters, if they didn’t have the utmost assurance that it is safe. And it is the duty and responsibility of the amusement park management and administration in order to make sure that before anything is fun and adrenaline-inducing, it is first safe for everyone.

So say that you have been the victim of an accident at an amusement park. The website of the Williams Kherkher personal injury lawyers states a few examples of causes of accidents at places like this as ones that are due to mechanical failure, operator negligence, poorly thought out designs, or the improper behavior of park attendees. Accidents in places like this can mean so much more than just a bruised knee or a forgivable paper cut.

The slightest misjudgment and negligence could mean broken bones, spinal trauma, or even death. Maybe a fire that would then cause burn injury or, along those lines, an explosion might occur.

There are so many variables to consider and the thing about amusement parks is that these variables should have already been considered for you. That you should experience something so awful as an accident within this establishment is something you, by law, should not have to be held accountable for as you have the right to pursue legal action in order to set things to rights.

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